The Stafford London Kempinski

Since luxury hotel group Kempinski took over the Stafford in February last year the group has spent around £6 million upgrading the meeting rooms, bedrooms and communal areas of the hotel. This much-loved stalwart of London hotels has been sympathetically refurbished to keep its grand hotel in a small package allure.

The four private dining rooms break down into two sets of interconnecting rooms, all of which can be hired individually or as a duo. The rooms all feel homely; like drawing rooms of a private house, rather than a hotel, and are ideal for small meetings but also intimate dinners or drinks then dinner. The Pink Room is notable because it’s not actually pink – more greens and beiges –the name is a hangover from years past when it was once, unsurprisingly perhaps, pink. Luxurious full length curtains give the room a Regency feel, compounded by the newly retouched gold filigree on the cornicing. Perfect for receptions or as a break-out room, it links with the Argyle Room, which sports a similar style but has a bluer hue to it and can seat around 10 private dining guests on a round or 12 on an oval. The Panel Room – a redwood panelled room is the anteroom for the Sutherland Room – a light (despite no natural daylight) room in soft aubergine and cream colours. Seating up to 30 – or 50 for a reception, the room connects with the main restaurant and has some striking artwork – namely a picture of five corgis who hang in the focal point of the room and create a very relaxed and slightly regal feel. But the piece de resistance at the Stafford is the Wine Cellar. An incredible find and a must for any wine lovers wanting to hold a party.

The largest wine cellar in London bar Buckingham Palace this is a warren of wine history. Not only is it possible to hold wine tastings in one vault, it’s also possible, once through the 500 bins of wine worth around £1 million, to have a dinner for up to 40. It’s not particularly glamorous, this is after all still a working wine cellar, but it’s fascinating, and, dating back to 1741, plush isn’t what this room about. It keeps a constant temperature all year, being 3 ½ metres underground and also features a space housing memorabilia from during the war when the wine cellars were used as an air raid shelter! A quirky, intriguing and genuinely unique experience.